Pass it on! Innovative approaches to making a difference in healthcare 

Pass it on! was a series of stories (2009-2010) about successful changes to the way healthcare is delivered.

Each story details an initiative that was either motivated or enhanced by evidence – whether observed in a specific project or emerging from scientific literature – and has resulted in better health outcomes for patients. The profiles provide practical ideas that can be adapted and used to inspire change in organizations across Canada.

18 / Aug / 2010
Young patients find their voice at Toronto’s SickKids Hospital
18 / Aug / 2010
Peer support at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
18 / Aug / 2010
The Ottawa Hospital: Supporting patients in making decisions about their care
18 / Aug / 2010
St. Joseph’s Health Care London: Consolidating services, improving care for breast cancer patients
01 / Nov / 2009
Consulting the experts: How Vancouver Island Health Authority engaged communities in strategic planning
Based on feedback from a process of community consultation, VIHA went back to the drawing board and re-drafted its strategic plan after Board members realized that – even more important than seeking community involvement – the organization needed to build credibility by acting upon what it heard from residents.
01 / Nov / 2009
Patient safety tops the agenda at the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority
Patient safety is not just the flavour of the month at the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. It is the No. 1 item on the WRHA board’s agenda – and it usually has a human face. The Quality, Patient Safety, and Innovation Committee reviews actual cases of patients who have died because of an adverse event.
01 / Nov / 2009
Capital District Health Authority uses ‘inconvenient truths’ to transform healthcare
Prior to 2006, the Board of Directors of Nova Scotia’s Capital District Health Authority was doing what it thought a board should be doing: controlling and managing financial risk for the organization it governed. However, it was also aware that the organization’s financial outlay was rapidly becoming unsustainable.
01 / Nov / 2009
Eastern Health learns that creating a new culture starts and ends with the Board
In 2005, when Joan Dawe was appointed to chair the Board of Trustees for Eastern Health, she took the helm of a new $1.2-billion health authority created from the merger of seven separate organizations within Newfoundland and Labrador. Like most of the boards Dawe had chaired since 1975, finance dominated their corporate agendas. However, Dawe saw a need for the board to move patient safety and quality of care to the top of its priority list.
01 / Feb / 2009
Responding to the needs of its community: Saskatchewan’s Women’s Health Centre is grounded in tradition
A 2006 review by the File Hills Qu’Appelle Tribal Council revealed a number of problems with its regional health system, which serves a population deemed “at risk.” Enter the Women’s Health Centre, a welcoming, holistic environment where nurse practitioners, midwives, and women’s helpers provide patients with a unique integration of Western healthcare and traditional First Nations healing.
01 / Feb / 2009
NPSTAT is reducing hospital transfers for long-term care residents in Mississauga Halton
An innovative new program in Mississauga Halton, Ontario, is reducing demand for hospital services, ambulances and acute care beds, while at the same time improving the quality of life of long-term care residents in the region. Nurse practitioners deliver a wide range of services in long-term care facilities and are averting hospital transfers as a result.
01 / Feb / 2009
Nurse practitioners and physicians collaborate for improved patient care at B.C.’s Interior Health Authority
Is it possible for nurse practitioners and physicians to work side-by-side in a traditional fee-for-service setting? Most definitely, say the staff at British Columbia’s Interior Health Authority, which is successfully pilot-testing a model of care that has health authority-funded, salaried nurse practitioners working collaboratively with physicians in a group practice environment.
01 / Feb / 2009
Calgary’s Pelvic Floor Clinic: Empowering women to improve their quality of life
Recognizing pelvic floor disorders as a growing health problem, the Calgary Health Region needed an innovative solution – one that minimized costs and maximized resources. For the past 10 years, the clinic has used the skills and abilities of its nursing staff to their full extent: in fact, many patients who receive care in the clinic never see a doctor.