Moving to Action: Evidence-Based Retention and Recruitment Policy Initiatives for Nursing

by Linda McGillis Hall et al. | Apr 16, 2013

Linda McGillis Hall, RN, PhD, FAAN, FCAHS, Professor and Associate Dean of Research and External Relations, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto

Sandra MacDonald-Rencz, RN, MEd, CHE, Executive Director, Office of Nursing Policy, Health Canada

Jessica Peterson, RN, PhD, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto

Sheri Price, RN, PhD, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto

Michelle Lalonde, RN, MN, PhD candidate, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing
University of Toronto

Gavin Andrews, PhD, Professor, Department of Health Aging and Society, McMaster University

Stacey Johnson, RN, PhD student, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto

Alexandra Harris, RN, PhD student, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto

MAIN MESSAGES

  • The majority of Canadian RNs in this study migrated to the US to obtain work, although some did so for the opportunity to travel or for personal reasons.
  • High levels of work satisfaction were noted by Canadian-educated nurses working in the US.
  • Over a third of Canadian nurse respondents who are currently working in the US are Baccalaureate-prepared.
  • Close to a quarter of Canadian-educated nurse respondents working in the US plan to return to Canada to work.
  • The number of Canadian nurses (both RNs and LPNs) who migrate across Canada for work is not large.
  • The majority of nurses who migrate across Canada for work do so for personal reasons.
  • Challenges with reciprocal licensing across Canada’s provinces/territories have been noted that impede mobility across the country.
  • Few incentives are offered to Canadian nurses who migrate internally to different provinces/territories for work.