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Nova Scotia Health Authority – Central Zone (formerly Capital Health)/Fraser Health (BC): Catherine MacPherson, Grace Park, Kathleen Friesen, Lisa MacDonald, Barry Clarke, Antonina (Annette) Garm, Lisa Chu.


 

Nova Scotia Health Authority – Central Zone (formerly Capital Health)/Fraser Health (BC)

  • Grace Park, Program Medical Director, Home Health, Fraser Health, Surrey, British Columbia
  • Antonina (Annette) Garm, Director, Site Operations, Delta Hospital, Fraser Health, Surrey, British Columbia
  • Lisa Chu, Director, Clinical Programs, Older Adult Program, Fraser Health, Surrey, British Columbia
  • Kathleen Friesen, Director, Clinical Programs, Population and Public Health, Fraser Health, Surrey, British Columbia
  • Barry Clarke, District Medical Director, Integrated Continuing Care; Director, Health Care of Elderly Residency Program, Dalhousie Family Medicine, Capital Health/Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Lisa MacDonald, Health Services Manager, Primary Health Care, Capital Health, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Catherine MacPherson, General Manager, Caritas Residence, Shannex Inc, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Proactively delaying frailty in not yet frail seniors: an interprovincial collaborative

Fraser Health and Capital Health have identified a common disconnect between the not yet frail seniors and community care supports, creating a barrier to healthy aging (or aging well) in the community. The fragmentation of services creates complexity for seniors; as a result, seniors are vulnerable and at increased risk of entering the acute care system prematurely. An early review of literature and local Fraser Health and Capital Health data indicate that the not yet frail seniors are better served outside the complex acute care system for as long as possible. Seniors that visit an emergency department (ED) or are admitted to an acute care facility are at high risk of contracting hospital acquired infections, falling and muscle atrophy to mention a few—conditions that delay recovery, reduce quality of life, and increase the cost of delivering care.

Evidence informed practices, partnership strategies, collaboration and coordination of services across the continuum of care—including seniors and their families, community, primary care and the heath authority—will be used to transform the current system from the traditional reactive approach to a proactive and patient-oriented system. Proactively delaying frailty in not-yet frail seniors will enable them to enjoy a higher quality of life within their communities for longer, and reduce unnecessary ED visits, avoidable admissions to acute care and premature admissions to residential care systems.

One problem, two provinces, one collaborative solution.