Towards Cultural Competency, Safety and Humility to Improve Health and Healthcare for First Nations

Learning from the B.C. Experience
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Towards Cultural Competency, Safety and Humility to Improve Health and Healthcare for First Nations: Learning from the B.C. Experience

Held December 1, 2015
12:00-1:00 pm EST


Synopsis:

Aboriginal populations (First Nations, Inuit and Metis) experience a greater array of health disparities compared to non-Aboriginal Canadians, including poor health outcomes and shorter life expectancies. Due to a number of factors including poor access to care and lack of cultural competency and safety, stereotyping and racism, many Aboriginal people don’t trust – and therefore don’t use – mainstream health care services. 1

Recognizing these challenges and the need to reduce health disparities, British Columbia (BC) First Nations, the Province of BC and the Government of Canada have established a new health partnership which has provided for the creation of the First Nations Health Authority of BC (FNHA). FNHA aims to improve health care for BC First Nations, including ensuring culturally competent and safe care.

In the spring of 2015, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) began working with the BC Ministry of Health, the FNHA, and the BC Provincial Health Services Authority to support the development of a declaration and framework for cultural competency and safety for First Nations in BC. In July 2015, the BC Ministry of Health, the FNHA, the BC Provincial Health Services Authority and all BC health regions signed a Declaration of Commitment on Cultural Safety and Humility in Health Services for First Nations and Aboriginal people.

This declaration marks an important first step towards embedding cultural safety and humility within and across health services. As a next step, a Guiding Framework for Action is currently being developed through a collaborative process. This framework will outline the high-level goals, objectives and actions necessary to embed cultural safety and humility into BC’s health system.

On December 1st, join Joe Gallagher, Chief Executive Officer for the First Nations Health Authority and Stephen Samis, Vice President, Programs at CFHI, as we explore the BC experience of developing the Declaration and the first steps towards embedding cultural safety and humility into the health system.

Objectives:

This webinar will provide participants with information about:

  • What cultural competency, safety and humility in health services means;
  • The process undertaken to develop the Declaration of Commitment and the core components of that document;
  • The ongoing development of a Guiding Framework for Action and the next steps for spreading this work within and beyond BC; and
  • Considerations for how cultural competency, safety and humility can be integrated or help re-design how we deliver care for all Canadians.

1 Health Council of Canada. Empathy, dignity, and respect: Creating cultural safety for Aboriginal people in urban health care. December 2012.

Speakers:

Stephen Samis, Vice-President, Programs, CFHI

Read biography >>

 

 

Joe-GallagherJoe Gallagher is of Sliammon First Nation ancestry and serves as the Chief Executive Officer for the First Nations Health Authority.

Mr. Gallagher leads the overall development and management of Tripartite Health plans and initiatives in British Columbia. This includes the planning and organizational development of the First Nations Health Authority; the first of its kind in Canada. His role includes the negotiation and implementation of the transfer of regional operations of First Nations & Inuit Health Branch – BC Region to the First Nations Health Authority. As the CEO, Mr. Gallagher provides leadership in the partnership development and works closely with federal and provincial governments, provincial health authorities, health professional associations and agencies to improve First Nations Health and Well-being. Mr. Gallagher provides strategic leadership towards the creation and implementation of a new health and wellness system, drawn upon the teachings and traditions of BC First Nations.

Throughout his career, Joe has worked with all levels of government, First Nations communities and organizations (in both rural and urban settings) and holds a degree from the University of Victoria.

Host:

Joanne Daniels is an Improvement Lead at the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement. She has a wealth of knowledge and experience around helping design and lead programs arising from her 16 years working with various CFHI portfolios. In the last two years, Joanne has been responsible for leading the Northern and Aboriginal Health portfolio which includes CFHI’s Northern and Remote Collaboration.